e-ISSN:2320-1215 p-ISSN: 2322-0112

Ryuji Sakakibara

Neurology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Sakura Medical Center, Toho University,564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura, Chiba 285-8741, Japan

Biography

Dr. Ryuji Sakakibara was born and raised in Japan. He received his medical degree from the Asahikawa Medical College in 1984. Because of interest in clinical neurology, he moved forward to Chiba University (Professor Keizo Hirayama) where he subsequently worked as an assistant Professor, and a Lecturer in the Department of Neurology. He completed his Ph.D. at the Department of Neurology, Chiba University, in 1992 (Professor Takamichi hattori). From 1997 to 1998 he was a research fellow in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery / Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, supervised by Professor Clare J. Fowler (retired in 2010) in the Department of Uro-Neurology. In 2007 March, he started a new Department of Neurology in Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, Sakura, Japan as an Associate Professor. He is a member of many international societies including the American Academy of Neurology, the Association of British Neurologists, the Movement Disorders Society, the International Society for Autonomic Neuroscience, the European Federation of Autonomic Societies, the American Autonomic Society, the International Continence Society, and the International Consultation on Incontinence. He also serves as an adhoc reviewer of several journals including Neuroscience Letters, Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, Journal of Neurology, European Journal of Neurology, Movement Disorders, Muscle and Nerve, Urology, Journal of Urology, Clinical Physiology, and American Journal of Physiological Medicine. During his career, Dr. Sakakibara has authored more than 250 articles in peer-reviewed international journals. 

Research Interest

 Dr. Sakakibara's research interests include neuro-urology, neuro-gastroenterology, autonomic physiology, drug trials and clinical neurology including Parkinson’s disease and multiple system atrophy.