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Research Article Open Access

Cross-Sectional Study on The Prevalence of Stilesia Hepatica on Small Ruminants Slaughtered at Modjo Modern Export Abattoir, Ethiopia

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Modjo Modern Export Abattoir, Modjo town, central Ethiopia from November 2007 to April 2008 on 1920 young and adult sheep and goats (960 sheep and 960 goats) from highland and low land areas. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of Stilesia hepatica in young and adult sheep and goats originated from highland and lowland areas of Ethiopia. The overall prevalence of Stilesia hepatica in sheep and goats was 31.43% (302/960) and 25.3% (243 /960), respectively. The prevalence of Stilesia hepatica in young and adult sheep was 25.8% (124/480) and 30.6% (147/480) and those of young and adult goats was 24.4% (117/480) and 27.5%. The prevalence in sheep from highland and lowland origin was 33.75 (154/480) and 27.5% (132/480), respectively and the prevalence in goats brought from highland and lowland origin was 26.8% (129/480) and 22.9% (110/480), respectively. The prevalence of Stilesia hepatica in highland sheep of adults and young was 33.75% (81/240) and 30% (72/240) and the prevalence of those of lowland origin adult and young sheep was 28.3% (68/240) and 26.25% (63/240). For the highland goats of highland adults and young the prevalence was found to be 25.42% (61/240) and 21.25% (51/240) respectively, for the lowland goats of adult and young the prevalence was 23.3% (56/240) and 17.9% (43/240) respectively. Statistically no significant difference was recorded in the prevalence of Stilesia hepatica between goats and sheep, between highland and lowland sheep and goats and between young and adults of the two species. In conclusion, this study indicated that Stilesia hepatica in sheep and goats is prevalent in the region from where sheep and goats are brought.

Tesfaye Bejiga*, Taye Solomon and Niguagus Leben

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