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Oral Hygiene and its practice

Lily Andrew*

Department of Dentistry, University of Liverpool School of Dentistry, Liverpool, UK

*Corresponding Author:
Lily Andrew
Department of Dentistry, University of Liverpool School of Dentistry, Liverpool, UK
E-mail: [email protected]

Received: 13-Sep-2022, Manuscript No,JDS-22-77144 Editor assigned: 15-Sep-2022, Manuscript No,JDS-22-77144 (PQ); Reviewed: 30-Sep-2022, QC No. JDS-22-77144; Revised: 07-Oct-2022, QC No. JDS-22-62004 Published: 14-Oct-2022, DOI: 10.4172/2320-7949.10.S1.002.

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Description

By frequently brushing one's teeth (dental hygiene) and cleaning in between the teeth, one can perform oral hygiene, which involves keeping their mouths healthy and free of disease and other issues (such as bad breath). In order to prevent dental disease and bad breath, it is crucial to maintain regular oral hygiene. The most prevalent dental illnesses are periodontitis, gingivitis, and tooth decay (also known as dental caries and cavities).

According to general recommendations, people should use fluoridated toothpaste at least twice daily, last thing at night and at least once more. Interdental cleaning, also known as interdental care, is just as vital as brushing your teeth. This is due to the fact that a toothbrush cannot clean in between teeth and only removes roughly 50% of plaque from the tooth's surface. Each person is free to select the instrument they wish to use when cleaning in between the teeth; alternatives include floss, tape, and interdental brushes.

White teeth or straight teeth may sometimes be linked to good dental hygiene. However, a clean mouth can have stained or misplaced teeth. People may use orthodontics and tooth whitening procedures to make their teeth look better.

More and more people are starting to realize how crucial the oral microbiome is to dental health. Data from human oral microbiology research suggests how complex environmental changes can cause a commensal microflora to transform into an opportunistic pathogenic flora. Instead of the germs, the host is what causes these alterations. The oral microbiome has changed significantly over time, moving more and more toward a disease-associated microbiome with cariogenic bacteria dominating during the Industrial Revolution, according to archaeological evidence of calcified tooth plaque. Compared to historical populations, the oral microbiota of today are substantially less numerous. In developed nations, caries (cavities), for instance, now affects 60%–90% of students and has become a major endemic disease. In contrast, early and pre-neolithic hominins rarely had periodontal and dental disorders.

Tooth decay and cleansing

The most frequent ailment in the world is tooth decay. In contrast to easy-to-clean areas of the tooth where fewer cavities arise, over 80% of cavities occur inside cracks in teeth where brushing cannot reach food left stuck after eating and saliva and fluoride have no access to hydrolyze and remineralize demineralized teeth.

To avoid cavities, gingivitis, gum disease, and tooth decay, dental plaque and tartar are removed from teeth during teeth cleaning procedures. At least one third of adult tooth loss can be attributed to severe tooth decay and cleansing. The most frequent ailment in the world is tooth decay. In contrast to easy-to-clean areas of the tooth where fewer cavities arise, over 80% of cavities occur inside cracks in teeth where brushing cannot reach food left stuck after eating and saliva and fluoride have no access to hydrolyze and remineralize demineralized teeth. It was once common to wipe sodium bicarbonate or chalk against the teeth, although with time, this technique may have negative influences.

To avoid cavities, gingivitis, gum disease, and tooth decay, dental plaque and tartar are removed from teeth during teeth cleaning procedures. At least one third of adult tooth loss can be attributed to severe gingivitis.

A variety of oral care has been applied to clean teeth even since time immemorial. This has been confirmed by several excavations carried out all over the world, where chew sticks, tree twigs, bird feathers, animal bones, and porcupine quills have all been discovered. Different kinds of tooth-cleaning instruments have been used historically. The neem tree and its products have been applied in Indian medicine to make teeth-cleaning twigs and other goods; one chews the end of the neem twig until it resembles the bristles of a toothbrush before using it to brush one's teeth. Since the Islamic Golden Age, the miswak, or siwak, formed from a branch or root, has been widely used in the Muslim world. It was once common to wipe sodium bicarbonate or chalk against the teeth, although with time, this technique may have negative influences.

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