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Prevention of Risk and uses of Phytochemicals in Human Health

Shana Martin*

Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain

*Corresponding Author:
Shana Martin
Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
E-mail: martinshan9090@gmail.com

Received: 01-Mar-2023, Manuscript No. JPRPC-23-93966; Editor assigned: 03-Mar-2023, PreQC No. JPRPC-23-93966 (PQ); Reviewed: 17-Mar-2023, QC No JPRPC-23- 93966; Revised: 24-Mar-2023, Manuscript No. JPRPC-23-93966 (R); Published: 31-Mar-2023, DOI: 10.4172/2321-6182.11.1.006

Citation: Martin S. Prevention of Risk and uses of Phytochemicals in Human Health. J pharmacogn phytochem.2023;11:006.

Copyright: © 2023 Martin S. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at Research & Reviews: Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry

About the Study

Phytochemicals are naturally occurring compounds found in plants that have been shown to have beneficial effects on human health. They are responsible for the colours, flavours and aromas of fruits and vegetables and they have been shown to have Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer properties. In this article, we will explore the role of phytochemicals in human nutrition and health. Phytochemicals are not essential nutrients but they have been shown to have a variety of health benefits. For example, flavonoids, which are found in fruits and vegetables, have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Carotenoids, which are found in orange and yellow fruits and vegetables, have been shown to have antioxidant properties and may help protect against age-related macular degeneration. One of the reasons why phytochemicals are so beneficial is that they work synergistically with other nutrients in food. For example, the antioxidant properties of vitamin C are enhanced by flavonoids, which are found in fruits and vegetables. Similarly, the absorption of carotenoids is enhanced by the presence of dietary fat.

Another important factor to consider is that different phytochemicals have different health benefits. For example, resveratrol, which is found in red wine and grapes, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Sulforaphane, which is found in broccoli, has been shown to have anti-cancer properties and may help protect against heart disease. Despite the numerous health benefits of phytochemicals, many people do not consume enough of them. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 1 in 10 adults in the United States consumes the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day. This is unfortunate, as a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein sources has been shown to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. So, what can we do to increase our intake of phytochemicals? Aim for at least 5 servings per day and try to include a variety of colors to ensure that you are getting a range of phytochemicals. In addition to fruits and vegetables, other sources of phytochemicals include whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes. It is also important to note that cooking can affect the levels of phytochemicals in food. Some phytochemicals are heat sensitive and may be destroyed during cooking, while others are more stable. For example, lycopene, which is found in tomatoes, is more readily absorbed by the body when the tomatoes are cooked. On the other hand, vitamin C is heat sensitive and may be destroyed during cooking. Phytochemicals are a diverse group of compounds found in plants that have numerous health benefits. They work synergistically with other nutrients in food and have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. To increase your intake of phytochemicals, aim to consume at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day and try to include a variety of colors. Remember that cooking can affect the levels of phytochemicals in food, so it is important to choose cooking methods that preserve their beneficial properties. By making these simple changes to your diet, you can reap the many health benefits of phytochemicals and improve your overall health and wellbeing.

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